What to Expect from Gum Contouring | Tyngsboro Dentist

endodontistWhen many people think of a perfect smile, they focus on bright, white, straight teeth. However, many patients realize that there’s another component as well – great looking gums. Never thought about your gums before? It isn’t something that many even consider when it comes to their smile. But some patients have gums that are too high, and others have gums that are too low. The causes vary – genetics plays a part, but certain prescription drugs can cause gums that cover more of your teeth than normal, and activities such as smoking can cause gum recession, causing your teeth to look longer than expected. Luckily, there is something that can be done to fix your particular gum issue – gum contouring.

Gum contouring is typically considered a cosmetic procedure – most insurance plans don’t consider it medically necessary and may not cover the costs. However, for severe cases of gum recession, exposed tooth roots can cause gum contouring to be considered a medical necessity, as the receding tissue can contribute to long term problems such as tooth decay and tooth loss. But, what can you expect?

The procedure can be done with traditional surgical techniques or lasers – ask your dentist to determine which they recommend. In many cases, local anesthesia is sufficient, though general anesthesia may be considered for larger procedures. The recovery is typically straightforward – there is some bleeding and swelling expected, but generally the soreness will subside within a week. At the end of the procedure, the patient can look forward to a gum line that is both healthy and cosmetically appealing.

Call Tyngsboro dentist Dr. James Yankowskas for a consultation at 978-649-7773. Also, visit our website at tyngsborocosmeticdentist.com.

Dr. Yankowskas proudly accepts patients from Tyngsboro, Lowell, Nashua, Dracut, Chelmsford, Dunstable and all surrounding areas.

Why Are My Gums Receding and Can I Stop It? | Dentist Tyngsboro

receeding gums

Does gum tissue grow back after they’ve receded? Are they really the result of brushing too hard? Or, do gums recede because of gum disease? These are just some of the questions that we will attempt to answer to try and shed some light on the heavily misunderstood oral condition known as gum recession.

Why Do Gums Recede?

The gum tissue is nothing more than a layer of skin that covers the bone tissue of the upper and lower jaws. And, so long as the underlying jaw bone stays intact, the gum tissue will stay straight and high on the teeth. Simply put, gums recede only because the bone responsible for supporting the gum tissue has withdrawn.

Can gums reform after they’ve receded? Yes, they do. How? Well, before we answer that question, it would be better to understand first what exactly causes the jaw bones to demineralize, and in turn, the gums to recede.

Here are the four top causes of jaw demineralization:

  1. Periodontal disease / advanced gum disease
  2. Bruxism / clenching and grinding of the teeth
  3. Trauma
  4. Genetics

Can You Stop The Gums From Receding?

It is indeed possible to stop or prevent gum recession. However, this can only happen if you first take the time to educate yourself about what can cause your gums to recede.

Here are the four likely causes:

  • Gum disease. For the intents and purpose of this post, let’s just assume that you have an active infection in your mouth. By the way, if you’re curious, most people actually do have an active infection, but that’s beside the point. In any case, gum disease should not be taken lightly. If left unchecked, it can progress to the point where it can compromise your jaw bones and your overall health. Not to mention, periodontitis, which is the advanced form of gum disease, can’t be cured.
  • Bruxism. Whether it’s caused by stress or sleep apnea, the habitual clenching and grinding of teeth can compromise the strength and structure of the jaws, which can make it prone to gum disease and in turn, gum recession.
  • Remember, while your teeth are built to be pretty solid, they’re not exactly meant to be smashed around. If left untreated, a chipped tooth – or in worse cases, a lost tooth or two – can put you at more of a risk for gum disease and subsequently, gum recession.
  • Sometimes, though, the thickness of the facial jaw bones may be determined by genetics. Although it may sound unfortunate, those born with thinner jaw bones are more prone to demineralization and are at a much higher risk for gum recession.

Gum recession often occur over a period of many years and usually comes with little to no pain or sensitivity until it’s too late. However, if you do start noticing your teeth appearing longer than before, or the spaces at the base becoming much wider, then be sure to contact your dentist asap. Although, it’d be better to not wait for any signs to show and make it a point to regularly visit Dr. Yankowskas every three to six months for check-ups and regular cleanings.

Call for an appointment today at 978-649-7773 or visit the website at www.tyngsborocosmeticdentist.com.

Gum Contouring | Tyngsboro Dentist

dental-bondingWhen many people think of a perfect smile, they focus on bright, white, straight teeth. However, many patients realize that there’s another component as well: great looking gums.

Some patients have gums that are too high, and others have gums that are too low. The causes vary – genetics plays a part, but certain prescription drugs can cause gums that cover more of your teeth than normal, and activities such as smoking can cause gum recession, causing your teeth to look longer than expected.

Gum contouring is typically considered a cosmetic procedure – most insurance plans do not consider it medically necessary, and will not cover the costs. However, it is available from many dental and periodontal offices. For severe cases of gum recession, exposed tooth roots can cause gum contouring to be considered a medical necessity, as the receding tissue can contribute to long term problems such as tooth decay and tooth loss.

The procedure can be done with traditional surgical techniques or lasers – ask your dentist to determine which they recommend. In many cases, local anesthesia is sufficient, though general anesthesia may be considered for larger procedures. The recovery is typically straightforward – there is some bleeding and swelling expected, but generally the soreness will subside within a week.

At the end of the procedure, the patient can look forward to a gum line that is both healthy and cosmetically appealing.

For more information on gum contouring, contact Dr. James Yankowskas and make an appointmentat (978) 649-7773 or visit our website.

Dr. James Yankowskas also proudly serves Lowell, Nashua, Dracut, Chelmsford, Dunstable, and surrounding areas.